Scientific Program

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Alain L Fymat

President, International Institute of Medicine & Science, USA

Keynote: Nanotechnology May Provide New Hope for Brain Cancer Therapy

Time : 10:00-10:40

Biography:

Alain L Fymat is a medical-physical scientist and an educator. He was educated at the University of Paris-Sorbonne and the University of California at Los Angeles. He is the current President/CEO and Professor at the International Institute of Medicine and Science with a previous appointment as Executive Vice President, Chief Operating Officer and Professor at the Weil Institute of Critical Care Medicine. He was formerly Professor of Radiology, Radiological Sciences, Radiation Medicine (Oncology), Critical Care Medicine, and Physics at several U.S. and European Universities. Previously, he was Deputy Director (Western Region) of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration (Office of Research Oversight), and Director of the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Center and for a time Acting Chair of Radiology at its Loma Linda, California Medical Center. He has extensively published (~ 425 publications including patents, books & monographs, book chapters, refereed articles). As invited/keynote speaker and member of organizing committees of international congresses and symposia, he has lectured extensively in the USA, Canada, Europe, Africa and Asia. He has been the recipient of numerous research grants from government, academia and private industry, and has consulted extensively with these entities. He is a Board member of several institutions and Health Advisor of the American Heart & Stroke Association (Coachella Valley Division, California). He is Editor-in-Chief, Honorable Editor or Editor of 32 medical-scientific Journals.

Abstract:

Cancer cells are notoriously resistant to drugs intended to kill them by rerouting the signaling networks responsible for cancer cells' growth, proliferation, and survival. A drug may block a particular signaling pathway but within a matter of days (minutes in some cases), cancer cells begin to rely on alternate pathways to promote their survival. The simultaneous use of several drugs (“rational combination therapy”)  is meant to attack both the primary and alternate pathways to preemptively block the cancer cells' escape route. Unfortunately, the efficacy of many combination therapies has been limited because drugs have very different chemical properties, which cause them to travel to different parts of the body and enter cancer cells at different rates. The situation is considerably more complicated for brain cancer (glioblastoma multiform or octopus tumor) because the cancer cells extend their tendrils into the surrounding tissue, which is virtually inoperable, resistant to therapies, and always fatal. A major obstacle to treatment is the blood brain barrier or network of blood vessels that allows essential nutrients to enter the brain but block the passage of other substances. I will describe novel nanotechnology approaches for delivering drugs across and around the brain protective barriers.

               

 

Keynote Forum

Youhe Gao

Professor, Beijing Normal University, China.

Keynote: Early candidate biomarkers found from urine of astrocytoma rat before changes in MRI

Time : 10:40:11:20

Biography:

Youhe Gao received his M.D. from Peking Union Medical College, his Ph.D. from University of Connecticut and postdoctoral training from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Harvard Medical School. He is the professor of Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences/ Peking Union Medical College. His research interests include urine proteomics, biomarker discovery, protein interaction and related bioinformatics.

Abstract:

Astrocytoma is the most common aggressive glioma and its early diagnosis remains difficult. Biomarkers are changes associated with the disease. Urine, which is not regulated by homeostatic mechanisms, accumulates changes and therefore is a better source for biomarker discovery. In this study, C6 cells were injected into Wistar rats brain as astrocytoma model. Urine samples were collected at day 2, day 6, day 10 and day 13 after injection, and the urinary proteomes were analyzed. On the 10th day, lesions appeared in magnetic resonance imaging. On the 13th day, clinical symptoms started. But differential urinary proteins were changed with the development of the astrocytoma, and can provide clues even on the 2nd and 6th day. Twenty seven differential proteins with human orthologs had been reported to associate with astrocytoma. A panel of differential urinary proteins may provide sensitive early biomarkers for the early diagnose of astrocytoma.

 

Keynote Forum

Louis Caze

CEO, Centre Louis Caze, France

Keynote: SUPPORTIVE CARE : THE PATIENT'S CARE ?

Time : 11:20-12:00

Biography:

Louis Caze  Professional experience in oncology circles, supported by multiple collaborations with major hospitals, allowed Louis Caze to benefit from a reference fame as an Expert Support Care. First, Specialist lymphatic, muscular and circulatory Louis Cazemakes the total body approach his chosen field. It captures the benefits of physical-mental balance in the treatment of chronic diseases, and specializes in supportive care dedicated to cancer diseases. His collaboration with renowned organizations such as the Institute Gustave Roussy, was punctuated with exceptional professional and human experience. Louis Caze is involved in implementing a comprehensive approach to cancer patient, in a real project of care that optimizes patient's quality of life, ensuring the different key aspects of health: the well physical and psychological, but also the entire social and family interactions. After these experiences, Louis Caze work for the development of Support Care, including the management of pain and psychology.

Abstract:

What is supportive care?

Support care means all care and support that can be offered to a person suffering from cancer, alongside specific treatments to cure his disease such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery. They aim to reduce the impact of disease and treatment. For this, a team of professionals specialized in very different fields put their skills available to patients to help them cope with this difficult time.

The support can be offered care during and after treatment of the disease but also when the cancer treatments have no effect. They adapt to the needs of patients and their families.

What needs do they meet?

The disease affects all aspects of daily life.

The needs that may occur are numerous.

support care can meet some of these needs:

• primarily to control the symptoms related to the disease or its treatment

• in case of physical or psychological suffering

• to break isolation

• to learn to live with the physical consequences imposed sometimes disease

• to resume normal course of his life and benefit from the best possible living conditions, and that whatever the chances of recovery

• for many other reasons, each patient with the needs of its own.

Being listened,to feel supported

Prevent pain

Food: a pleasure and a need

Staying in tune with her body

A new impetus to social life

 

Keynote Forum

Youhe Gao

Professor, Beijing Normal University, China.

Keynote: Urinary protein changes in walker 256 tumor-bearing rats

Time : 14:50-15:30

Biography:

Youhe Gao received his M.D. from Peking Union Medical College, his Ph.D. from University of Connecticut and postdoctoral training from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Harvard Medical School. He is the professor of Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences/ Peking Union Medical College. His research interests include urine proteomics, biomarker discovery, protein interaction and related bioinformatics.

Abstract:

Without homeostatic control, urine reflects early changes in the body. In this study, the Walker 256 tumor rat model was established by subcutaneous injection. To identify urinary proteome changes during the entire development of cancer, urine samples of walker 256 tumor-bearing rats were collected at five time points corresponding to before cancer cell implant, before tumor mass palpable, tumor mass appearance, tumor rapid growth and cachexia respectively.

The urinary protein patterns on SDS-PAGE changes significantly as tumors progress. Urinary proteins were identified using an Orbitrap-Lumos mass spectrometry by label-free quantitation. Seven differential urinary proteins before tumor mass even palpable could be identified with a fold change >2 and p value <0.05. And these early changes in urine could also be identified at tumor mass appearance, tumor rapid growth and cachexia time points. Twenty-four differential proteins were annotated before as biomarkers of cancer and nine proteins as biomarkers of breast cancer. Additionally, it was found that those differential proteins were involved in several pathways related to cancer, including IL-6 and IL-12 signaling, production of nitric oxide and ROS and apoptosis. Finally, 30 dynamically changed urinary proteins were selected for validation by targeted proteomics. Our study suggested that urine is a sensitive biomarker source for early detection of cancer.

 

  • Cancer Prevention And Management
Location: San Antonio, USA

Session Introduction

Robert O. Young

Director, PH Miracle Medical Association, USA.

Title: Alkalizing Nutritional Therapy in the Prevention and Reversal of any Cancerous Condition

Time : 14:00-14:25

Speaker
Biography:

Robert O Young has been widely recognized as one of the top research scientists in the world in the nutritional sciences . He has a PhD in Nutrition, an MSc and a DSc in biology and chemistry. He also has a ND in the naturopathic sciences. Throughout his career, his research has been focused at the cellular level having a specialty in cellular nutrition, he has devoted his life to researching the true causes of "disease," subsequently developing The New Biologyâ„¢ to help people balance their life. In 1994, he discovered the reality of biological transformation of red blood cells into bacteria and bacteria to red blood cells. He has documented several such transformations. His research findings have been published in several noted journals, including The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. (Sympathetic Resonance Technology, Scientific Foundations and Summary of Biologic and Clinical Studies, Dec. 2002, Vol. 8, No. 6: 835-842). Metabolic and Dietary Acids are the Fuel that Lights the Fuse that Ignites Inflammation that Leads to Cancer!. Int J Complement Alt Med 3(6): 00094. DOI: 10.15406/ijcam.2016.03.00094 He is the author of numerous articles (Herbal Nutrition 1988) and author and co-author of many books including: Herbal Nutritional Medications (1988), One Sickness, One Disease, One Treatment (1992), Sick and Tired (Woodland Publishing, 1995), Back to the House of Health (Woodland Publishing, 1999), The pH Miracle (Warner Books, 2002), The pH Miracle for Diabetes, (Warner Books,2003), Back to the House of Health 2, (Woodland Books, 2003), The pH Miracle for Weight Loss (Warner Books, 2004), The pH Miracle revised and updated book 2 (Hachett Books 2010), The Cure for Type I and Type II Diabetes (Hikari Media 2013), Reverse Cancer Now (Hikari Media, 2014), The pH Miracle for Cancer (Hachett Books 2015) and The pH Miracle for Heart Disease. He has currently sold over 5 million pH Miracle books in 191 countries and his books are translated in 29 different languages.

Abstract:

Due to the evident ineffectiveness of conventional cancer treatments (e.g. chemotherapy and radiation), more efficient alternatives are needed. The potential of Alkaline Nutritional Infusion (ANI) as a legitimate alternative to chemotherapy and radiation is examined. While largely ignored in conventional oncology, the pH of the interstitial fluids of the interstitium is suggested as paramount in identifying any cancerous condition. It is further suggested that cancer is an over-acidic condition of the interstitial fluids that can be reversed and prevented with alkalizing treatments such as ANI. Full Body Bio-Electro Scan (FBBES) is presented as a noninvasive means to examine body pH and the presence of cancer. In addition, non-invasive Full-Body Thermography (FBT) and Full-Body Ultrasound (FBU) are presented as a noninvasive means to examine the physiology and the anatomy of the ograns, glands and tissues for inflammation, calcifications, cysts and tumors in the prevention and treatment of any cancerous condition. Finally, Live Blood Analysis (LBA) and Dried Blood Analysis (DBA) are non-invasive hematology tests for evaluating the health of the red and white blood cells and to view inflammatory and malignancy at the cellular level. In contrast to the acidosis caused by conventional cancer treatments, ANI methods such as Intravenous Nutritional Infusion (INI) and Rectal Nutritional Infusion (RNI) provide an alkalizing approach to cancer treatment and prevention.

 

  • Cancer Therapeutics
Location: San Antonio, USA

Session Introduction

Mohamed El-Senbawy

Menoufia University, Egypt

Title: Ribociclib as First-Line Therapy for HR-Positive, Advanced Breast Cancer

Time : 14:25-14:50

Speaker
Biography:

Dr El Senbawy is an assistant lecturer of clinical oncology, Menoufia university, Egypt.He obtained his medical degree and master degree at Menoufia university.He started his residency at Menoufia university hospitals on October 2011 ,and completed his training with fellowship at Menoufia university hospitals. Dr El Senbawy has his experience in clinical oncology with special interest in radiotherapy and cancer registery. 

Abstract:

Background: The inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4/6) could potentially over­come or delay resistance to endocrine therapy in advanced breast cancer that is positive for hormone receptor (HR) and negative for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2).

Methods: In this randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of the selective CDK4/6 inhibitor ribociclib combined with letrozole for first-line treatment in 668 postmenopausal women with HR-positive, HER2-negative recurrent or metastatic breast cancer who had not received previous systemic therapy for ad­vanced disease. We randomly assigned the patients to receive either ribociclib (600 mg per day on a 3-weeks-on, 1-week-off schedule) plus letrozole (2.5 mg per day) or pla­cebo plus letrozole. The primary end point was investigator-assessed progression-free survival. Secondary end points included overall survival, overall response rate, and safety. A preplanned interim analysis was performed on January 29, 2016, after 243 patients had disease progression or died. Prespecified criteria for superiority required a hazard ratio of 0.56 or less with P<1.29x10-5.

Results: The duration of progression-free survival was significantly longer in the ribociclib group than in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.72; P=3.29x10-6 for superiority). The median duration of follow-up was 15.3 months. After 18 months, the progression-free survival rate was 63.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 54.6 to 70.3) in the ribociclib group and 42.2% (95% CI, 34.8 to 49.5) in the placebo group. In patients with measurable disease at baseline, the overall response rate was 52.7% and 37.1%, respectively (P<0.001). Common grade 3 or 4 adverse events that were reported in more than 10% of the patients in either group were neutropenia (59.3% in the ribo- ciclib group vs. 0.9% in the placebo group) and leukopenia (21.0% vs. 0.6%); the rates of discontinuation because of adverse events were 7.5% and 2.1%, respectively.

Conclusions: Among patients receiving initial systemic treatment for HR-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer, the duration of progression-free survival was significantly longer among those receiving ribociclib plus letrozole than among those receiving placebo plus letrozole, with a higher rate of myelosuppression in the ribociclib group

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Shashikant Limbachiya

Surgical Oncologist, Narayana Multispeciality Hospital, India

Keynote: Reconstruction of complex Head & Neck cancer defects

Time : 10:40:11:20

Biography:

Dr Shashikant Limbachiya is super specialist (MCh)  Head & Neck Onco Surgeon  working in  Gujarat India. He was awarded MBBS degree from BJ medical college & Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad. After his post graduation in Master of Surgery(Otorhinolaryngology),  he did super speciality(MCh) from world renowned amrita Institute, kochi. He is founder of India’s first Dysphagia society, “Deglutology Research Foundation”. He is being awarded as research scholar from various organisations. His area of interests are oral,laryngeal,sinonasal, skull base, thyroid, parotid & Neck surgeries as well as Reonstructive Platic & Microvascular procedures. He has authored  6 text book chapters and several publications in reputed journals. He has presented several Keynote/award/ podium papers in various international conferences.

 

Abstract:

Management of head and neck cancer has evolved over the last decade, so too has the reconstruction of defects created by ablative surgery. Reconstruction of surgical defects using Regional/ Microvascular free tissue transfer is integral part of multidisciplinary management of Head and Neck cancers. The central tenets of post-ablative head and neck reconstruction are the restoration of adequate function, form and esthetics, which maintain or improve quality of life. Reconstructive surgeon must have  various options in his armamentarium to give best restorative outcomes in available resources.

 

 

Keynote Forum

Omnia Hassan Gohar

Surgical Oncologist, Cairo University, Egypt.

Keynote: Laparoscopically Harvested Omental Flap in Immediate Breast Reconstruction

Time : 11:20-12:00

Biography:

Dr Omnia Hassan Gohar, specialist of surgical oncology at DCI, Egypt. I have more than 12 years experience in surgical oncology. Dr. omnia have graduated with honors from Cairo University Faculty of Medicine in 2004. she has done master's degree in surgery in 2010, Ain Shams University. I have wide experience in variety of surgical oncological procedures and oncoplastic surgery especially breast and head - neck surgery. Dr. omnia have participated in researches about national statistics of cancer etiology and incidence.

Abstract:

Objective: Various options have been proposed to reconstruct the breast’s volume, including local flaps, expanders and implants, transposition of the latissimus dorsi, gluteus or the rectus abdominis muscle flaps. Although these techniques may achieve excellent results, these have been disappointing due to an additional scar is left in the patient’s donor region (Delay E el al., 1998). A technique of oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS) using laparoscopically harvested pedicled omental flap has been developed in the past 10 years in attempt to overlap donor-site deformity and morbidity. Since the early 21st century, European scholars reported breast reconstruction with laparoscopically obtained omental flap successively (Salz R et al,1993; Cothier-Savey I et al, 2001). A few years later, Zaha from Japan reported their experiences on breast reconstruction with laparascopically harvested omental flap after BCS and demonstrated the safety and feasibility of this procedure (Nishimura T et al, 2002; Ferron G et al, 2007). 
 
Patients and methods: A prospective descriptive study had been conducted at Surgical Unit of OCMU, in which  25 Patients underwent immediate  oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS) using laparoscopically harvested omental flap after breast conserving surgery (BCS)  or skin sparing mastectomy in the period from  June 2016 to January 2018. 
 
Result: The omentum flap is very attractive method for breast reconstruction especially in lower inner quadrant which present an obstacle for oncoplastic surgeon for many years. 
 
Conclusion: The omentum flap is extremely malleable, adapts easily, and has a long and reliable vascular pedicle with no addithional scar and little donor site morbidity. The employment of the omentum flap in breast reconstruction provides volume and consistency very similar to the contra-lateral breast alone or as soft coverage system that is thick enough to conceal silicone implants with a good aesthetic result.  
 

Keynote Forum

Nabil Desoky Magwry El- Baher

Radiation oncologist, Menofiya University, Egypt.

Keynote: Early detection of breast cancer at low-income countries.

Time : 12:00-12:40

Biography:

Medical oncology experience 5 years from Aldoaa hospital, Mataria teaching hospital, Nasr institute of health and Consultant clinic.Internal medicine and emergency resident in el-salaam specialist hospital (government specialist centers )2010-2012.Fellowship of radiotherapy.

Abstract:

In spite of the current controversy surrounding over diagnosis, mammography remains the standard for breast cancer screening. However, Breast self-examination may appear to be an appropriate screening procedure; however, randomized trial in Egypt produced negative results largely because of non-compliance. Clinical breast examination is also an attractive option for low-income countries.

     The incidence of breast cancer, although rising, remains substantially lower in low-income countries than that in the developed world. For example, in India, the crude incidence rate is 18.45 per 100,000 compared to 157.1 in the US. Low incidence rates raise serious questions about cost-effectiveness of screening. Lack of adequate and easily accessible breast cancer treatment facilities and that of reliable cancer registries are other barriers to screening in these countries. Lack of awareness about hazards of breast cancer is another major challenge since this leads to low motivation and poor compliance to screening. A high degree of compliance is essential at every level of screening for it to be successful. These include compliance to the screening test, attendance at the referral center for further investigations, compliance to the prescribed treatment if cancer is confirmed, completing the entire course of treatment which can be prolonged and attendance at regular follow-up. Although the Mumbai study recorded >70% compliance overall, this was achieved at a high man-power cost. Nearly 100 full-time personnel had to be engaged to make door-to-door visits on multiple occasions to persuade women to comply with the various steps of screening in addition to examining 75,000 women every two years and maintaining yearly surveillance on the control group. The study highlighted that for screening to be successful in low-awareness countries, a vertical programme is essential. A rough estimate based on the Mumbai experience suggests that a vertical programme to screen all women aged 35 – 64 in India, and to achieve ∼70% compliance, would require over US$ 100 million per year in man-power cost alone. Whether this money is better spent on strengthening breast cancer treatment facilities, for developing human resource in cancer care or for remedying the many deficiencies in the health-care delivery system in general is the moot question.

 

Keynote Forum

Shashikant Limbachiya

Surgical Oncologist, Narayana Multispeciality Hospital, India.

Keynote: Alteration in Swallowing physiology consequent to surgical interventions and management of Dysphagia in Head & Neck Cancer

Time : 14:00-14:40

Biography:

Dr Shashikant Limbachiya is super specialist (MCh)  Head & Neck Onco Surgeon  working in  Gujarat India. He was awarded MBBS degree from BJ medical college & Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad. After his post graduation in Master of Surgery(Otorhinolaryngology),  he did super speciality(MCh) from world renowned amrita Institute, kochi. He is founder of India’s first Dysphagia society, “Deglutology Research Foundation”. He is being awarded as research scholar from various organisations. His area of interests are oral,laryngeal,sinonasal, skull base, thyroid, parotid & Neck surgeries as well as Reonstructive Platic & Microvascular procedures. He has authored  6 text book chapters and several publications in reputed journals. He has presented several Keynote/award/ podium papers in various international conferences.

Abstract:

Dysphagia (swallowing dysfunction) is a debilitating, depressing, and potentially life-threatening complication  in cancer patients that is likely neglected. In last two decades oncological outcomes has improved with advance in surgical and radiation methods, that’s why quality of life needs to be addressed among survivors. This keynote lecture is aimed  to give precise information on dysphagia in head and neck with a focus on assessment tools, prevalence, complications, and impact on quality of life. Management of swallowing dysfunctions will be covered with recent advances and available evidences in all subsites of head and neck cancers who are  treated with curative  surgical / chemoradiation modality.

 

 

  • Cancer Diagnosis & Therapy
Location: San Antonio, USA